Category Archives: Random

Casting Call for Employable Me – American Documentary

This week I found an email from Liz Alderman, casting director for the documentary series “Employable Me“, looking for candidates for an American based documentary. Obviously, due to my anonymous status, I will not be appearing on TV any time soon.

However, this issue is one that is near and dear to my heart. Too many Autistic people who want to work are unemployed/underemployed. I hope this show will bring light to why companies SHOULD hire Autistic people.

Please contact Liz if you are interested and SHARE if you know someone who might be.

Employable Me SHOW GRAPHICS

ENGLAND’S CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED DOCUMENTARY TELEVISION SERIES “EMPLOYABLE ME” IS COMING TO AMERICA!

CASTING DIRECTORS ARE SEEKING PEOPLE WITH NEURO-DIVERSE CONDITIONS OR DISABILITIES WHO HAVE STRUGGLED TO FIND LONG TERM EMPLOYMENT WHO WOULD LIKE ASSISTANCE IN THEIR SEARCH FOR WORK.

Optomen Productions is looking for people with neuro-diverse conditions and disabilities who would like our assistance finding employment, and who are willing to share their job search journey with the American television viewing audience by being a part of our critically acclaimed documentary television series, EMPLOYABLE ME.

EMPLOYABLE ME seeks to prove that having a neurological condition or disability should be viewed as an ASSET rather than an obstacle in the workplace.

High profile, aspirational companies and brands are beginning to discover the benefits of recruiting from the ranks of the disabled and those whose “brains are wired differently.”

What if your “disabilities” turned out to be a strength?  What if your condition actually gave you skills that were a virtue rather than a hindrance?  What if they turned out to be invaluable qualities that put you AHEAD of rival candidates?

We all deserve a role in society and the opportunity to pay our way. The job-seekers selected to appear on our documentary series will be encouraged to unlock their hidden talents with the help of experts and specialists so they can at long last find the job that best suits their unique skill sets and strengths.

That’s what this show is about: the struggle to belong and play your part. The disabled just need a chance for people to see what they can do, rather than concentrating on what they can’t.

 

Take a look at these inspiring highlights from our hit series to date:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0755nyq/clips

 

And view a full episode of our courageous series here:

https://vimeo.com/162540081

PASSWORD: job123

The bottom line is, a diverse workforce can be great for a business and this series wants to dramatically shake up the system to prove it.

Please pass this casting call along!  Television producers and casting directors like myself rely heavily on personal recommendations and word-of-mouth referrals to find interested and qualified people.  We appreciate your help!

Contact Liz.Alderman@OptomenUSA.com for more information on how to be considered for this opportunity. 

Optomen Productions produces hundreds of hours of television each year for many of the major cable and broadcast networks including Food Network, Travel Channel, Nat Geo Wild, Animal Planet, Investigation Discovery and Bravo.  Our most successful series include Worst Cooks in America and Mysteries at the Museum.  Visit http://www.optomenproductions.com/ for more information about our company.

Autism is a Controversial Issue – People Fighting Online

I left Facebook a while ago because I kept getting sucked into the arguments between parents and Autistic people, Autistic people and the anti-VAX movement, and medical professionals and Autistic people. Today I logged back in and was quickly reminded why I left.

The first thing thing that upsets me is that all of these people think they know more about Autism than Autistic people, as if our first hand experiences are of little or no value. This is often parents but can also be medical professionals and organic health nuts (I eat organic but these people are extreme).

Cure culture fanatics telling us we are sick for wanting to stay Autistic – sick for wanting to stay the way we were born. Parents telling us we don’t understand because we are not like their child (some of us WERE at one point and have worked hard to improve as we grew up). Doctors telling us our claims don’t make sense to them , dismissing our complaints.

Next I am saddened for the children who’s parents are always telling everyone what a burden their child is. Many non verbal children can understand spoken language and may be able to read some day. Putting comments like this on the internet publicly doesn’t feel right to me. Telling everyone your child is broken doesn’t seem like loving acceptance either.

Brain damage and Autism do have similar traits but even if you have a brain damaged child – shouldn’t you love them? I am not a parent. All I know is how I would feel if my parents said those things about me.

If someone always talks about you with pity you will eventually begin to pity yourself. From a mental health standpoint this can cause a LOT of problems. Autistic people seem have more health problems and anxiety when they have low self-esteem.

There are a lot of unknowns with Autism. It seems there may be many contributing factors but my money is on genetics for most cases. Human brains are changing at a rapid rate, trying to keep up with the quickly changing world around us.

My brain is at ease with nature in the fresh air. The artificial world is unpleasant to me. Is this something primitive left over in my genetics, or am I a canary in the coal mine? Science may tell us some day.

Most upsetting are the people who want to cure and prevent Autism. I fear this could be a big problem for humanity if they succeed. All of the different brain types and thinkers make the world a better, more progressive, and interesting place.

I hate that this issue is tearing people apart. People get so heated and angry when someone disagrees with them on this topic, they say nasty things with little regard for the other person. It is nasty it is ugly and we really need to stop.

Stop telling Autistic people they are unwanted by society. That is what you are telling us when you say you want a cure for Autism or want to prevent Autistic people from being born. You are saying that being dead is better than being Autistic and I disagree.

I know you can’t reason with or speak to these people. They are close minded and the frustration, like Facebook, is a waste of my time – so I log back off and return to a happier place (my own blog).

The day this went live on Twitter someone took offense to my blog. Its crazy. You can not please everyone and my OCD would make sure I NEVER hit publish if I tried.

Letter to My Younger Self

Dear Me, so bright eyed and bushy tailed.

Wild child, who can’t sit still, full of joy bouncing off the walls. Yes you are strange, but please don’t fear your uniqueness. Be you, don’t grow bitter.Stay strange and amazing.

You have so much potential. Yes, your mother is right you are smart. Stop believing when people tell you otherwise.

It’s okay that you don’t need people. That makes you independent NOT defective. You are not cold and robotic you are calm and logical. Yes you do things differently but some day this will be your strength.

The people who picked on you never made it far in life. It was them not you who had the problem. Bullies are insecure and often suffer on the inside, lashing out to make themselves feel bigger. Don’t be like them. Stay kind.

Silly girl, who talks to the animals and trees. Never stop. Don’t worry about what other people think of you. You are perfect just the way you are.

 

With deepest love,

-Me

Diagnostic Criteria for Neurotypical Spectrum Disorder

Are you or is someone you know hyper social? It could be Neurotypical Spectrum Disorder.Read below to find out more and follow #NTDiagnosis

Neurotypical Spectrum Disorder           999.00 (F97.0)

Diagnostic Criteria

A.      Persistent over-activity in social communication and social interaction across multiple contexts.

1.       Insistence on social-emotional reciprocity, ranging, for example, from constant social approach and early adaptation of back-and-forth conversation; to encourage sharing of interests, emotions, or affect; to a constant seeking to initiate or respond in social interactions.

2.       Over awareness of nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction, ranging, for example, from integrated verbal and nonverbal communication; to eye contact and body language or overestimation in understanding and use of gestures.

3.       Early onset in developing, maintaining, and understanding relationships, ranging, for example, from ease adjusting behavior to suit various social contexts; may engage in sharing imaginative play, easily make friends without assistance. Also may show an over interest in peers.

Specify current severity:

Severity is based on social communication impairments and restricted repetitive patterns of behavior (see Table 2).

B.      Enjoys a wide range of interests, or activities, with a difficulty focusing on one task through completion, as manifested by at least two of the following, currently or by history (examples are illustrative, not exhaustive; see text):

1.       Lack of repetitive motor movements, use of objects, or speech (e.g., simple motor stereotypies, lining up toys or flipping objects, echolalia, idiosyncratic phrases).

2.       Insistence on variance and flexibility, dislike of routines, or ritualized patterns or verbal nonverbal behavior (e.g., no distress at small changes, ease with transitions, lose thinking patterns, aversion to rituals, need to take new route or eat different food every day).

3.       Highly flexible, fluid interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus (e.g, weak attachment to or preoccupation with others and socializing).

4.       Hyporeactivity to sensory input or lack of interests in sensory aspects of the environment (e.g., apparent indifference to pain/temperature, indifferent response to nature, specific sounds or textures, lack of interest in smelling or touching of objects, shows no visual fascination with lights or movement).

Specify current severity:

Severity is based excursiveness of of social communication and fluid, overly flexible patterns of behavior (see Table 2).

C.      Symptoms must be present in the early developmental period (but may not become fully manifest until demands exceed limited capacities, or may be masked by learned strategies in later life).

D.      Symptoms cause clinically significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of current functioning.

E.       These disturbances are not better explained by other disabilities or illnesses.

Note: Individuals with a well-established DSM-VIII diagnosis of Communitive disorder, Socialem’s disorder, or other hyper-social disorder not otherwise specified should be given the diagnosis of Neurotypical spectrum disorder.

 

 

How would an Aspie diagnose a “Neurotypical” person if the tables were turned. Just for fun. I hope this peace bring thoughts and a smile. It is not intended to be offensive in any way.

With Love,

“Anna”

I’m on Twitter!

I finally caved and signed up for Twitter.

I may not long into my account every day but if you follow me on Twitter you will get notifications and news about Autism and the Anonymously Autistic blog.

Let’s connect!

@AnonymouslyAnna

I Love to Hate You – Autism & Socks

Socks.

It is more of a Sensory Processing Disorder problem than an Autism problem, but maybe it’s an Autism problem because we don’t explain the discomfort to the people around us.

We don’t know you don’t feel the same way we do about socks. We think that our behavior should be self explanatory because socks just suck that much. I have very early memories regarding the unpleasantness of socks. They felt like fiberglass burning into my ankles and the seam was a large lizard wiggling around on my toes.

When I was a baby my mother liked to dress me in socks with lace trim. I hated lace more than anything. Thinking about those socks makes me itch. Nothing could ever make them feel right. Looking around me everyone had socks. I thought you all were crazy. Why on earth would anyone put up with this much pain?

My mother said it was to protect my shoes, because shoes are expensive. It was a logical enough explanation, but as I got older I remember rubbing my feet and ankles raw by pawing at my socks.

Wet socks and wet clothing have always been impossible for me. My mother once asked me to put on wet socks. I can’t remember very clearly what happened after she asked that question (perhaps I had a meltdown) but I feel like the situation ended with vomit.

As I got older I started picking my own socks at the store. Ankle socks with no seam in the toe were my favorite when I could find them on sale. I had expensive taste in socks. If I could not find socks without a seam, I prefer ankle socks with a seam on top but they have to be soft.

I tried wearing shoes without socks, most of the time I ended up with blisters on my tinder feet.My balance is not the best and I am a bit of a klutz. I imagine my feet take quite a beating when not protected by socks.

Flats were great until my feet began to sweat. Pools of sweat feel like oceans in my shoes – it is ALMOST as bad as wet socks.

I try to stock up when I find a type of sock that I like. If a company changes their socks it will take me a while to get used to them.

Nothing is more annoying than a sock problem. The distraction is so intense it becomes hard to think about anything else without stimming. Maybe that is why I went barefooted so much as a child. I loved the feel of warm dry grass and hot asphalt on my feet.

I don’t run around with my shoes off any more. Now that I’ve found socks that feel nice I prefer not to feel small things under my feet. (As an adult, at 125 lbs, your feet hurt more when stepping on objects than they did when you only were closer to 60lbs.)

Even now there are some sensory days that I just can’t handle socks. If that happens I don’t wear them. It’s that easy. It is not fair that I put myself through the torture.

Itchy socks take away my valuable spoons. I need those they are mine!

I’ve been wearing socks for over 30 years now. It has taken me a long time to go from hating socks to loving socks.

Baby steps, progress is progress no matter how long it takes.

Autism is Full of Misunderstandings

Autism is marked by impaired communication abilities so it would make since that Autistic people often feel confused and misunderstood.

I don’t pick up on subtle social cues and hints. If you don’t tell me something directly, I’ll miss it. If something is implied I might not catch it.

Your annoyed face may not be registered in my brain – so if I am ticking you off I probably won’t know until you blow up in my face. If that happens I am completely caught off guard and have no clue what I did wrong.

I sometimes process things on a delay. I think it’s because of the amount of information I am able to take in at one time. There is so much to process that my brain saves some information for later and I may not process it for seconds, minutes, or days. This makes for inefficient conversations.

I have alexithymia and inappropriate affect so my face may not always be appropriate for the situation or conversation. Sometimes I laugh when people give be bad news. Apparently you should NOT laugh when someone tells you their mother has just passed away.

People often misunderstand my intentions. When I am too quiet people think I am hiding things and when I talk too much I am “selfishly” dominating a conversation. I don’t mean to do either of these things though.

When I am quiet it is because I lack confidence. I am painfully aware that I have trouble with timing in conversations. Sometimes it is easier for me not to talk so people don’t think I am rude.

When I am relaxed and with friends I tend to talk too much and over everyone. All my observations are from my point of view because I can’t take other people’s perspectives easily which makes me sound self centered.

Conversations are like a chess game where I can’t remember the rules. People think I don’t care to talk or to listen but really I just don’t know when I should talk because unfortunately – Autism is full of misunderstandings.

 

10 Things NOT to Say When Someone Comes Out as Autistic

I mentioned in a previous blog post that coming out as Autistic can be just as hard or harder than coming out as gay or bisexual.

Coming out as Autistic is hard. So hard that most of the time I just stay anonymous. Below are 10 REAL comments that I have heard first hand when trying to “come out” as Autistic.

Maybe if Autistic people stop getting comments like the ones below more Autistic people would come out of the closet.

  1. You don’t look Autistic.
  2. Autism is just a result of bad parenting.
  3. You just need to learn to grow up.
  4. There is nothing wrong with you.
  5. If you tried harder you could over come your struggles.
  6. You just want attention.
  7. You are just delayed.
  8. Everyone has a little Autism.
  9. You must be high functioning.
  10. Autism is just a different way of thinking. Its not really a disability.

Autistic Confession – I Still Do Best With A Visual Schedule

I know it’s a bit stereotypical, but I learned to keep my schedule written out in front of me and always had a calendar / appointment book with my schedule and due dates handy.

When I was younger I was the dorky kid with a Casio electronic organizer and planner.

As an adult, these tools have evolved. Thanks to modern technology I am able to use Google Calendars and Outlook to stay organized. My mobile phone allows me to access these things easily from anywhere. Everyone has a phone these days so I hardly stand out because of this.

It is important that I use my calendar, and check it regularly otherwise I forget to do things and miss appointments. I need my calendar to be an efficient adult.

Asperger’s, Disappointment, Friendships & Shutdowns — The Bush Shack

Nicely put. Its always hard to quickly explain Autism to people. I always want to start with a full history on Autism through the ages and Hans Asperger. I need quicker ways to explain my struggles to people.

Some things that a neurotypical person can shrug off, can actually become debilitating for someone like myself with Asperger’s. If I’ve had my hopes up for something, I get really excited. I mentally prepare for the occasion, whatever it may be, which is a process in itself that can take some time! If that […]

via Asperger’s, Disappointment, Friendships & Shutdowns — The Bush Shack