Tag Archives: autism speaks

Please Read Autistic Perspectives This Autism Awareness / Acceptance Month

As you may or may not know April is Autism Acceptance / Awareness Month and this year I am putting out a plea that everyone read, share, and encourage anyone talking about Autism to read blogs, watch videos, and learn from actual Autistic people – not big organizations like Autism Speaks.

If you are an Autistic person with something to day, or anyone with something positive to say, I would like to encourage you to write, share your experiences, and be a light of truth in the world. We need more Autistics Speaking and less Autism Speaks (and other organizations about Autism run by Neurotypical people) speaking about Autism.

Finally, thanks to the internet, many of us can no speak (I use that term loosely since some of us prefer to type) for ourselves and it’s time to speak up (and share). If you can’t share publicly, I’ve found anonymous blogging amazing.

Support the online Autism community. Share and connect with other Autistic bloggers – remember some of them may have social anxiety and may not want to meet face to face. It feels good knowing that you are not alone.

Remember there are many diagnosed Autistic people in the world, waiting to be woken up. Many of us did NOT understand Autism until we read the words of other Autistic people. Some day when you google Autism, I dream the works of actual Autistic people will appear on top.

People know about Autism but they don’t understand what it really is or Autistic people.

If you want to learn about Autism, why not go straight to the source? – an Autistic person.

 

#ActuallyAutistic #AutismAwareness #AutismAcceptance #SheCantBeAutistic

Autism Acceptance Day Wish List

This year for Autism Acceptance Day I have five wishes. Some day they may come true – then my work blogging will be complete.

  1. I wish everyone would be aware of Autism, what it really is, and what it really isn’t. Too many misconceptions about Autism are out there, what causes Autism, what Autistic people need. Someday I hope the rest of the world can accept the truth.
  2. I wish Autistic people could be accepted for who they are. In my dreams People would not ask us to change or be more “normal”. Sitting a chair, rocking back and forth while humming would not be thought of as strange. Eye contact would not be forced and passing would be a thing of the past.
  3. I wish Autistic women and adults would stop being overlooked. The media, Autism organizations, and Autism service providers are often focused only on children. People seem to forget about Autistic adults, as if we grow out of our brain types as we age. For me, the older I get the more Autistic I feel – but since I “function so well” cant really be that Autistic or need services (sarcasm).
  4. I wish Neurotypical people would understand what passing is. Maybe if they understood the work that goes into pretending to be “normal” they would not ask this of us. Maybe if people understood passing they would not doubt me when I tell them I am Autistic. I hate being called / thought of as a lair.
  5. I wish we could stop pathologizing Autism. Maybe if people understood, accommodated, and accepted us we could start thinking of Autism as a difference not a deficit. Yes, I know we have our difficulties and commodities. Trust me I have my own, however a LOT of my disability comes from the fact that people around me are unaccommodating of my requests. They call me dramatic and high maintenance, when the lights above me are making my brain throb and I ask to sit somewhere with better lighting (or ask for other accommodations).

 

#ActuallyAutistic #SheCantBeAutistic

Autism Speaks Changes Mission – No Longer Seeking Cure

I’ve had negative feelings towards the organization Autism Speaks for a long time.

The were like a large and mighty enemy, spreading cure culture and promoting Autistic genocide.

They wanted to find a way to prevent Autistic children from being born (according to their mission statement) and that made me VERY uncomfortable.

 

In a 2006 press release, Autism Speaks stated as its goal “to accelerate and fund biomedical research into the causes,prevention, treatments and cure for autism spectrum disorders; to increase awareness of the disorder; and to improve the quality of life of affected individuals and their families. [. . .]
We are dedicated to funding global biomedical research into the causes, prevention, treatments and a possible cure for autism. We strive to raise public awareness about autism and its effects on individuals, families and society: and we work to bring hope to all who deal with the hardships of this disorder.”

Autism Speaks was a giant and I was just one little voice desperately screaming the only truths I knew through a keyboard.

My voice is small, but I was not alone.

We spoke out, we screamed, we made videos. Autistic people all over the world spoke up and together our voice was large.

Maybe our voices grew loud enough that the giant finally heard us – or at least that is the happy story that I’m telling myself.

The truth is I don’t have an insider’s point of view from Autism Speaks, so I can’t possibly know the reason.

At this point does the reason really matter?

The new version, which the nonprofit says has been in the works since at least late last year, takes a decidedly different tack.

“Autism Speaks is dedicated to promoting solutions, across the spectrum and throughout the lifespan, for the needs of individuals with autism and their families through advocacy and support; increasing understanding and acceptance of autism spectrum disorder; and advancing research into causes and better interventions for autism spectrum disorder and related conditions,” reads the update. “Autism Speaks enhances lives today and is accelerating a spectrum of solutions for tomorrow.”

Michelle Diament – Disability Scoop

This new language makes Autism Speaks feel more like a friend. It is almost like we want some of the same things. Is it too good to be true?

I have the cookie in my hand, but I am hesitant to take a bite. Is it laced with slow acting poison?

As awareness has progressed, more have come to understand that autism spectrum disorder is not an illness, but a neurological difference that may present challenges for an individual growing up in a world designed for the neurotypical brain. An estimated one in 68 children in the U.S. are on the autism spectrum. It’s important to remember these children grow up to be autistic adults, who deserve support and acceptance.

Finally, after years of suffering, are we heading out of the “Autism Dark Ages”?
So much harm has already been done. Can they really repair the damage? Only time will tell but I feel as if this is a step in the right direction.

E is for Eugenics — The Bullshit Fairy

As I scrolled through my news feed, the following post stopped me in my tracks.

E is for Eugenics [Autism Acceptance Month] Eugenics, in this context, is the deliberate research into the identification of genetic markers for autism with the goal of prevention, as it is seen by those who participate, to be a genetic defect and undesirable trait. Autism Speaks says they are “dedicated to funding global biomedical research […]

via E is for Eugenics — The Bullshit Fairy