Tag Archives: Relationships

Autism’s Not So Bad – Why I Focus on The Positive

On this blog I share my difficulties so that others who have similar troubles will know they are not alone.

In life I try to focus more on the positives. It is better for me to focus on the things I can do versus worry over the areas I’m lacking.

I could beat myself up over my flaws until my self-esteem is in the toilet and I slip into a deep darkness. Trust me I’ve been there before and getting down like that is not helpful. Sure, I have limitations and disabilities but we all have troubles and obstacles to overcome.

When I was younger adults pointed out my flaws. Teachers and school highlighted all the ways I was a failure. I felt completely inadequate and was physically ill from anxiety.

My skills and artistic abilities were always discouraged. Nobody pushed me to peruse my talents. People assumed I would grow up and never make anything of myself.

It has taken years to recover from this trauma. The past few years have been the best years of my life – especially since discovering my Autism. The amount of self compassion needed to accept this truth helped me shift my thinking.

My Autism has given me quite a few gifts that I would like to highlight. These are the things I think about during my day. Reflecting on the positives keeps me going, making sure I don’t fall into a pit of self-pity. I have to keep moving.

I am extremely detail oriented (almost to a fault sometimes) but when doing the right types of tasks I am better than most at catching certain things.

My personality – these traits I believe come from my Autism. I am very loyal, honest, and self motivated. Above all things I value the truth.

I am a very dedicated employee and am great at following a list of tasks. I don’t socialize when I should be working and generally try to do work I love. I work hard and follow the rules.

Peer pressure does not get me. I am able to see when others are being illogical. I am a VERY logical person. I can also be calm when others panic (depending on the situation).

I have a bond with animals and nature. A walk in nature cures anything in my soul.

I’m not afraid to go against popular opinions – and will often comment when I disagree with them.

My perspective is different. Autism affects the way I intemperate the world so I have a unique perspective. This can be very helpful in a group when looking for new solutions.

I see music videos when I close my eyes and recall songs in my head like a jukebox. The movies come alive in full color. This is just magical. I also memorize songs and know all the words to just about every song I enjoy.

I can write in a way that comes from my Autistic experience. I’ve read so many books. As a child I read fiction, Stephen King, Dracula, and many more adult books. I remember the beautiful patterns in the words. I’ve read all the classics and now I read non-fiction. These things have rubbed off on me.

Patterns are everywhere and I see them. I see pasterns in everything – people, objects, concepts. Sometimes I get lost in them but I’ve learned to use these things as a guide for my life. It makes things more predictable – which most Aspies can appreciate.

Synesthesia – I enjoy mine but am not ready to put the experience into words. Sometimes it is distracting and even distressing. It made driving very difficult. Until about a year ago I didn’t even know there was a word for my experience. Still – I actually love this part of myself and would NEVER give it up.

So despite the days where I am sharing a painful experience, these are the things in my mind on a day to day basis. I remind myself every day of the ways I am blessed so that I am not overcome by darkness.

Misunderstandings

So many misunderstandings.

People read too much into meaningless things.

If I don’t look at you when you speak

you assume I’m not listening.

When my body language

doesn’t do what you’d expect

or when I laugh in the wrong moment.

If I say something using the wrong tone

you may think I’m rude.

If I cannot speak

I must be hiding something.

Over and over,

we confuse each other.

When I take something you say literally,

or my brain skips hearing words as you say them.

Sometimes I need time to process.

If I don’t get it

we’ll both stay confused.

Sometimes I can’t explain myself.

Please trust me.

Sometimes I process things on a delay.

Maybe we can talk about it another day – maybe not.

I’m not ignoring you or trying to

leave you hanging.

If I look confused, I probably am.

Give me time to figure things out on my own.

Don’t treat me like a child.

It’s only

a misunderstanding.

A poem about Autism and misunderstandings. Being Autistic sometimes feels like nobody understands you. Other times you know instantly that some misunderstanding has occurred.

Oops – I’ve Lost Another Friend

Oops I’ve lost another friend

I thought that we were close

But you’ve got needs

that I can’t fill

You want more from me than I can give

I leave you feeling empty

You tell me friends hang out more

When my social anxiety gets the best of me

and I would cancel

at first you calmed to understand

Eventually you got tired of waiting

telling me you wanted more

I know now

and it breaks my heart

that I must let you go

Goodbye my friend of many years

My friend who cannot understand

I hate to see you go

and will miss you when you’re gone

but your no good for me

when you hurt me so

your words cut deep

we cannot repair

I’m afraid you’ve got to go

A poem about losing friends.

Being Autistic has made it more difficult for me to make friends. I don’t bond with everyone but deeply care about the friends I have. Loosing a friendship is like burying a friend.

It is a great and painful loss but if the relationship is not mutually beneficial than I can see no point.

I have Social Anxiety Disorder – sometimes I cancel plans but it doesn’t mean I did not want to hang out. My fiends feel unwanted and one by one most of them have drifted away.

People don’t understand and I can’t blame them for that – doesn’t mean it does not sting whenever it happens.

 

My Biggest Secret – I’m Smart!

Most people who meet me have no idea. I  am a fly on the wall or a clown making jokes, deflecting from my deepest darkest secret. Nobody would ever guess, because my verbal (spoke) vocabulary is nothing particularly remarkable.

People sometimes describe me as “funny, silly, and quirky”. My coworkers describe me as “positive, friendly, warm, and kind”. Apparently the word feels as if I am a bubbly personality – they have no idea of the deep dark secret hiding within me.

Nobody knows that I am smart. I don’t run around wearing my IQ (144 SD15) on my blouse. That number is subjective.

If a cat tell’s a fish he is stupid because he cannot climb a tree he will never appreciate that the fish can breath under water – the cat cannot breath under water. The fish and the cat are different not less (as Temple Grandin said).

Most day’s I don’t feel particularly smart. I am great at problem solving, writing, and other random things, but sometimes struggle  greatly with basic life skills.

It is a frustrating enigma. People often say things like “you’re too smart for this” – I remember my mother saying this to me repeatedly through my childhood. Whenever I make a mistake it is always “because I am not trying hard enough”.

Growing up you learn that bragging does not bring you many friends and your parents beg you to stay humble so you hide your talents. Hidden under the dirt  and rocks your beauty can not shine.

My readers – you are my dear friends. Nobody knows my secret but you. Please do not spread this information around because nobody who meets me would ever believe it. 😉

Let your light glow. Do the things you love, be yourself, sing off key.

We are all smart in different ways. You cannot test a cat and a fish for the same skills.

Coming Out Autistic – When You Don’t Believe

Coming out Autistic is hard. It’s even harder when the person in front of you doesn’t believe a word you are saying.

People who’ve known me for years say things like –

“Why are you complaining all of the sudden? You never used to talk about Autism or complain about these problems before. It’s like you’re happy to have a disability. You just want attention.” 

 

These people are less than half right.

Yes, people who have known me for years have never heard me complain about my sensory issues. When I was a little girl and tried to explain my problems to people nobody believed me – so I stopped.

When I was in school I was very sick. My school building’s busy environment and florescent lights were painful and made me physically sick to. The doctors told my mother that there was no physical reason for my sensory complaints and that I was making them up to get out of school.

There were no accommodations for me growing up so I spent my life sick, in pain and discomfort.

My mother told me I had to go to school or she would go to jail, not wanting to loose my mother, I sucked it up and went.

Side note – remember Aspies take things literally. Be very careful what you say to your children.

 

I suffered in silence for thirty years.

I’ve always been different, but my mother told me never to reveal your flaws – so I learned to hide my confusion and executive functioning problems from the world.

Keeping up appearances, trying to be like everyone else and holding myself to an impossible standard, was what eventually lead me to an Autistic Burnout (Autistic Regression).

Finally as my sensory symptoms intensified, after years of confusion and being told that “everything was in my head”, at the age of 30, I received a formal Autism diagnosis.

Am I happy to have a disability?

No. I was chronically ill my entire life and everyone always told me I was faking it. I am happy that FINALLY a doctor has an answer for me. After years of searching I know WHY I am always sick.  I am happy that I finally have the answers and information needed to take care of myself.

I am happy to know that my “illness” is not something more serious or terminal. Part of me used to think that I might have some sort of cancer or rare disease that might kill me some day. This thought is gone now.

They are also correct about my obsession with Autism being recent. 

I was Anonymously Autistic for thirty years and didn’t even know it.

I never spoke about Autism before learning about Autism. Is that really so strange?

Until accidentally stumbling across Dr. Temple Grandin (my hero) I didn’t know what Autism was. Listening to her words and the way she described the way she experienced the world was a shocking revelation to me. I will be forever grateful for the work she has done educating the world about Autism.

Here is where people always get things wrong. 

I don’t want attention. Most of the time, due to my social anxiety, I wish I was invisible.

I’m not trying to complain when I point out a sensory trigger. 

Now that I know what’s going on with my body and brain, it is easier for me to understand my triggers. People say I am complaining when I ask for simple accommodations, like a change in lighting or to wear earplugs. They say, “You never asked for these things before.”

I’ve always had triggers, but I had learned to ignore them, making things worse. All because people don’t want to hear me “complain”.

I am reminded of my mother’s words – “You’re not dying – get up!”

They don’t know about the secret headaches and physical pain caused by certain sensory experiences – if I try to tell them they accuse me of complaining or exaggerating.

I’ve been getting up and acting like everything is okay for a long time now. It’s tiresome but apparently I’m so good at passing that even some of my closest friends can’t see (and refuse to believe in) my Autism.

It hurts that they think I am lying or crazy, but I try to remind myself that they are only responding to what I’ve let them see over the years. They only see the tip of the iceberg.

Do I show them more or let them go? I get the feeling they don’t care to know more.

Luckily my immediate family has been very supportive and encouraging. They remember how I was as a child and don’t doubt the diagnosis. I am grateful to have their love and support. Coming out to them was easy because I was not met with doubt.

Coming out Autistic is hard for a multitude of reasons – people don’t believe you, people don’t know what Autism is, people think Autism can be cured, people think Autism only affects children, the list goes on and on.

Hands down the worst thing about coming out is when you try to come out to someone close to you and they basically tell you – “No, you’re making this up. There is nothing wrong with you.”

Cut down like a tree.

When you don’t believe it hurts so bad that I want to stop sharing but I can’t because the world needs to know – for all the other Anonymously Autistic people in the world.

#AnonymouslyAutistic #ActuallyAutistic #SheCantBeAutistic

 

 

Laura Spoerl – How My Autism Affects Sex, and How Sex Affects My Autism – The Mighty

“Do Autistic people have sex?” Yes – we do… and sometimes we don’t. That all depends on the situation.

I don’t talk about sex much on my blog but sex happens so let’s talk about the amazing article written by Laura Spoerl contributor to one of my favorite sights – The Mighty.

Sometimes when you have sensory processing disorder sex is uncomfortable even if your partner is doing everything right. It can be hard for us to communicate with our partners about our needs and discomfort.

For me sex can be very pleasurable, painful, and intense.

I still think of it as something used for reproduction more than anything else.

I’ve got a strange relationship with my own sexuality. There have been times in my life where I was non-sexual, hyper-sexual,  sapiosexual, and bisexual. Honestly I don’t know  where my sexuality stands. I just love good people.

Although I can completely relate to what she has to say – I can take NO credit for the information below PLEASE do check out Laura’s full post HERE on The Mighty.

We are all creatures who derive satisfaction from and continuously seek out anything that feels good to us. Individuals on the spectrum are not exempt. I crave intimacy because regardless of what I may have, it’s still a natural instinct. Like flirting, if I initiate sex I’m better able to control the sensory reactions that sometimes come up for me.

Participating in flirting and sex calls us to be present in those moments. With autism it means I’m constantly analyzing it. It’s automatic and subconscious. I actually have to tell myself somewhere in my brain to stop, loosen up the rigidity, and just feel and go with the flow.

PLEASE do check out Laura’s full post HERE on The Mighty.

Ask an Autistic: Living Atypically – “Coming Out”

Just made a comment today on Wrong Planet talking about how, in many ways, coming out as Autistic can be just as hard if not harder than coming out as gay or bisexual.

People have so many preconceived ideas about what Autism is and how I – as a woman who blends in well – does NOT fit that idea. Often I feel like I am “in the closet” because people don’t really understand Autism. They don’t understand me.

#sadbuttrue

Because I also suffer from Alexithymia it is especially hard for me to talk about my Autism with certain people.

I can take NO credit for Amythest Schaber‘s video. Please check her out and subscribe to her channel.

10 things I wish people knew about dating someone who has autism

Once again I can not take credit for this amazing article, however I stumbled across it whole obsessing over one of my two special interests – Autism.

I think Kerry may be one of my new favorite bloggers! 🙂

Here are some things you need to know when it comes to dating someone with autism…

      10. Just because we may want to be by ourselves at times doesn’t mean we don’t care about you.

Some of us want to unwind during a long day just like anyone else.

      9. Eye contact may be difficult for us at times.

When we are having a conversation if I’m not looking at you right in the eyes don’t think I’m trying to give you the cold shoulder.

       8. Ask me any question you have.

Although we may have difficulties with communication, we still need you to be as open with us as possible to avoid misunderstandings. Ask us questions early to avoid issues later.

 

Please do check out Kerry Margo’s blog  and the full post here.

I See Problems & I Fix Them

I am good at seeing problems that others seem oblivious to. In addition I also tend to come up with unique solutions to the problems in front of me. Problem solving is my native language and I am good at it.

When I see a problem I am overcome by a strong urge to fix it. It is very hard for me to ignore a problem once it has made itself known to me, and I am compelled to work towards a solution until a satisfactory one is found.

This can create a difficult situation if the people around me cannot see the problem that I am trying to point out or do not agree that a situation needs attention.

I see the world with a critical eye. Inefficient and pointless activities drive me crazy. This is why I often fail at “girl talk”. My best friend told me recently, point blank, that sometimes she needs to talk just to vent and that when she is venting she does not want a solution.

My overly logical brain has a hard time with this, but because I care deeply for her, I now make efforts to sit quietly when she is talking. It is difficult for me to understand when I should talk and when I should listen, so most of the time I just try to stay quiet.

Conversations without a clear goal are baffling to me. Talking to people takes up a lot of my energy, especially when I am unable to determine the meaning of or reason for a conversation.

It’s not even that I do not like talking to people. Meaningful conversations with people who are close to me are actually very  enjoyable, but they still wear me out.

Fixing problems gives me energy. I get a high off of the mental stimulation that problem solving provides. This is my strength, that is why I see problems and I fix them.

 

 

 

 

 

Watch Autism In Love Online for Free – NOW through Apr 10 2016

UPDATE – as of 6/4/2016 this documentary is currently on Netflix.

The highly anticipated documentary, Autism In Love can be watched online for free until April 10, 2016 on PBS.org via the link below.

Finding love can be hard enough for anyone, but for those on the autism spectrum, the challenges may seem overwhelming. The disorder can jeopardize the core characteristics of a successful relationship — communication and social interaction. Autism in Love offers a warm and stereotype-shattering look at four people with autism as they pursue and manage romantic relationships.

http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/videos/autism-in-love/