Melissa McGlensey – The Mighty – 22 Truths People Affected by Sensory Processing Disorder Wish Others Understood

Melissa McGlensey wrights about Sensory Processing Disorder on The Mighty.

On a bad day, my sensory issues can be the worst part of my life. What makes it even harder is the fact that nobody, unless they have SPD, can possibly understand the pain and discomfort that I am going through when a full blown attack is happening.

People think I am being dramatic, whining, or complaining… so I keep things to myself. The truth is, some days I feel worse than others. Some days my symptoms go completely unnoticed but when they are bad they can not be ignored.

I can take ZERO credit for the following quotes. Please see the full article here on The Mighty.

“I do not complain about bright lights, smells, tastes, rough touch, etc., just to annoy others. I am overwhelmed by sensations and am learning how to process differently. Until then, please be patient with me.” — Sandra Cusack

“When I need to go reset, it’s not because I’m being dramatic. To be in a room of people is constant stress on my mind and body to make sense of an environment that makes simple sense to you. Sounds, smells, lights, brushes against people, all of it had to be decoded and reiterated into a language my brain can understand, and there can’t be more input when I’m trying to do that. I need a space free from all stimuli to give my brain the break it needs to process things… Just give me a minute to myself. And please don’t interrupt it.” — Hailey Remigio

“Just because I look fine on the outside doesn’t mean I’m not struggling inside… Even the professionals I take my kids to assume so much. They do things like talk to me in a crowded waiting room. They assume just because I’m an adult I’ve figured out how to handle my sensory issues. I didn’t know what SPD was for most of my life.” — Holly Newt

How Autism ‘Awareness’ and the School System Failed My Brother and Me

Wow THIS article by Nora Burritt contributor to The Mighty is AMAZING!

I can take no credit for the article below, although so much of what Nora had to say could be my own words. The little girl below could easily have been me -or a million other invisible Autistic women.

There is a huge problem in the way Autism is treated and how women and girls are being missed . We really are invisible and grow up wondering why we always fall short of others expectations of us.

We wonder why we are not good enough. We wonder why we are different. Eventually when the pressure gets to be too much we implode and find ourselves staring down an official Autism diagnosis – despite all the signs being visible at childhood.

Boys are diagnosed as toddlers. Women are diagnosed in their 20’s and 30’s (or older). I know a woman who was diagnosed at 68. We NEED to do better. We owe it to our sisters and daughters.

There is a photo of me at 3 years old. I am standing in a meadow on the tips of my toes, arms scrunched up like a t-rex, hands blurred from excitedly flapping.“You were so cute!” my family members coo when they pass this photo. These are the same people who look at me and say, “You can’t be autistic, you’re a girl!”

I hit developmental milestones quite differently than others. For instance, I never learned to crawl forwards, I was speaking complete sentences at a year old and reading books by 3. I wasn’t potty trained until I was almost 4 and said to my mother, “I am finished with diapers,” and that was it. I would bolt and hide in clothing racks in stores and cry when my parents made me try something new.

Sensory wise, I was notoriously known for my aversion to dirt, anything soft, loud noises, flashing lights, and many other things. I walked on my tip-toes constantly, chewed apart all of my shirts and gel toys, rocked and spun enthusiastically. I struggled with math concepts to the point where I barely skimmed by. I used to cry constantly in preschool and elementary because I couldn’t regulate my sensory system or handle my surroundings. I was often in the principal’s office because teachers misunderstood me trying to comprehend with me being insubordinate. In middle school, when a psychologist brought up Asperger’s syndrome with my mother, she laughed and called him “crazy.”

See full article here.

What do YOU Think About Autism Speaks?

Personally I find it offensive when people talk about wanting to find a cure for Autism. People say – you are high functioning so you can’t speak for parents of children who will never live on their own. There is a debate raging online where Aspies and parents of Autistic children are fighting.

In life I believe that we should always focus on the positives and be grateful for the good things. Yes my sensory processing disorder causes me a LOT of hardship sometimes BUT my Autistic brain is who I am. I would never want to change that although I would LOVE for the world to be more accepting and accommodating for those of us who have sensory sensitivities and special needs.

 

the ginger mommy diaries talks about why she does NOT light up blue in her video – Autism Awareness Month + DO NOT LIGHT IT UP BLUE | Autism Speaks SUCKS 

I can take no credit for her video. Please check out the ginger mommy diaries on YouTube and subscribe to her channel.

Ask an Autistic – What is Alexithymia? (Difficulty Expressing Your Emotions)

I was VERY excited when I logged onto YouTube today and saw that Amythest Schaber had posted a video. This video goes over something that I have always struggled with and have never been able to express.

I suffer from extreme anxiety – however I do not always know how I feel. My body is going through VERY intense symptoms physical symptoms of anxiety but mentally I tend to be unaware of the anxiety building.

I have a very hard time with cognitive empathy but when I am near someone who is feeling strong emotions I often feel their feelings inside me. I do not like to be around people when they are having strong emotions.

Sometimes someone else’s emotion may influence me without me even realizing my mood has changed. It is wild how it creeps up. Mindfulness and writing help me. I have to make an effort to pay attention to what my body is doing.

Please check out Amythest Schaber on Youtube and subscribe to her for more GREAT content. I can take NO credit for her video.

Meghan Scarfo of The Mighty – The Type of Sensory Overload I Find Enjoyable

There are definitely sometimes where my finely tuned senses can be enjoyable and even a strength. For those times when I am not sick – I can definitely relate to a lot of what Meghan Scarfo, writer for The Mighty, has to say about the positive side of Sensory Processing Disorder.

I can take NO credit for the any of the information below. Please be sure to check out the full post here on The Mighty.

You see, sensory overload isn’t always a negative experience for me. My special relationships — which are few and far between — have the ability to cause profound sensory overload. It’s an aura that’s difficult to explain. The sensations I feel are overwhelming and heartwarming at the same time.

[…]

Neurotypical people may find these sensations difficult to understand. I have a hard time explaining it myself. A simple message, phone call or hug from the person with whom I feel this way produces a response that makes time stand still. It’s an overpowering tingling sensation or warmth coupled with heart palpitations. A truly unexplainable experience. The moment may be brief or long-lasting, but it’s very intense.

This type of sensory overload is extremely powerful, yet enjoyable. Caught in a daze or a “fog” so to speak, everything pauses around you for that moment.

I’d like to think of this sense as a gift. It’s an ability to connect with someone on such a level that is unheard of.

 

 

Amythest Schaber – Ask an Autistic – What is Autistic Burnout?

I am having some difficulties and may need to scale back on my actives. I had even asked myself the question – Am I becoming MORE Autistic?

Could it be that new responsibilities and a change in routine are to blame?

One of my favorite Autistic bloggers, Amythest Schaber, talks about Autistic Burnout in the YouTube video below. Although I LOVE her content I can take NO credit for it. Please follow Amythest on YouTube.

Melissa McGlensey – 14 People With Sensory Processing Disorder Describe What It Feels Like – The Mighty

I’ve been really addicted to reading on The Mighty’s website. They have created a positive and supportive webpage filled with great stories and advice for others who live through the struggles that many of us face from day to day.

In the following article, which I can take absolutely NO credit for, Melissa McGlensey of The Mighty, shares how people describe what Sensory Processing Disorder feels like.

“It’s like having the worst hangover you can imagine. The rustle of newspaper can make your ears buzz the same way they would if you were listening to really loud music. People talking can make you cringe because it sounds so loud. Sunlight can literally feel like you are blinded. At my worst, I cannot tolerate any light. It’s like your brain is going to explode because it can’t handle the stimulation. It’s really scary, upsetting and can make one very anxious.” — Hay Green

“All of the sensory input your mind normally tunes out can start to overwhelm your conscious mind. It’s like when you become aware of your blinking and notice every blink for a few seconds, but more extreme. Trying to push past the hyper-awareness of every noise and touch will take away any amount of patience and attention you had for what you were doing. It makes it very hard to interact ‘normally’ because you are so caught up in your own head.” — Elizabeth Engel

“Suddenly everything is too loud, too bright, too much, and you just want to run to a dark, quiet corner to curl up in for hours.” — Sarah Whiting

Please be sure to follow The Mighty on Facebook and check out the full article here.

 

 

 

Lamar Hardwick – The Mighty – The Real Reason You Don’t Think I’m Autistic

Lamar Hardwick contributor to popular disability page The Mighty shares a story that many of us can relate to. In response to a comment that many of us have heard before “You don’t look / seem Autistic? You must not be THAT Autistic.” As if all Autistic people look the same.:-/

The Aspie World -AUTISM MELTDOWN – What Is A Meltdown?

I am currently averaging 2-4 meltdowns a month. I hate them so much and can never explain them to my loved ones.

The hardest part is that I know I look like an irrational crying child and there is nothing I can do to stop the reaction once I’ve been pushed passed the tipping point.

The Aspie World – one of my favorite YouTubers. Talks about Meltdowns in the following video. Please subscribe to The Aspie World on YouTube.

Do you have an Anonymous Autism story?

Are you a closet Aspie? Is Autism part of your life?

Do you have a positive, uplifting, and inspirational Autism story that you would like to share Anonymously?

Email anonymouslyautistic@gmail.com

Please change any names you don’t want used in advance.

I am limited in how many posts can be shared per month and respectfully reserve the right to pass on posts that are not in alignment with my message.

This site is intend to inspire through sharing stories & experiences. The opinions of the writers are there own. If you have a medical question talk to your doctor. Thank you.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 977 other followers